Luke is the longest Gospel of the four and as much as half of the material in Luke is unique to his Gospel providing additional information about Jesus Christ.

The Gospel of Luke is the first half of a two-part work (Luke-Acts). The Gospel informs the reader what Jesus said and did and the Book of Acts reveal what Jesus did through the Holy Spirit following his ascension—a continuous story that was composed to be read together.

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Luke contains an extended birth narratiJesus Nazareth Palm Mormonve, highlighting the story of Elisabeth and Mary (Luke 1), and is the only Gospel that records the story of Jesus going to Jerusalem when he was twelve years of age (Luke 2:41-50). Like Matthew, the Gospel of Luke provides a detailed discussion of the wilderness temptation (Luke 4:1-13). Additionally, Luke provides more parables than the other Gospels, including some of Jesus’ most memorable stories such as the Good Samaritan and Prodigal Son (Luke 10:30-37; 15:11-32).

As noted above, Luke also highlights the role of women and provides important information about Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Susanna and many others (Luke 8:2-3). The author seems to be interested in Jesus Christ as healer and records his activities in this regard (see for example, Luke 8:41-56).

Luke highlights Jesus’ final week, emphasizing that Jesus Christ taught in the temple each day (Luke 19:47). Additionally, Luke details how Jesus prepared the disciples for his departure.

Finally, the Gospel provides a detailed discussion of what happened on the first day of the week, when Jesus was raised from the dead (Luke 24).

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