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Latter-day Saints (Mormons) Share Witness of Resurrection in Social Media

Latter-day Saints (Mormons) Share Witness of Resurrection in Social Media

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are sharing their witness of the Savior, their love for Him, their knowledge of His atonement, crucifixion and resurrection online this Easter weekend in an unprecedented social media wave. Witnesses are posted on mormon.org, a site created to share Mormon beliefs with friends of all faiths. We invite you to take a look and to share and extend the witnesses you see and read with those you love and those in your broadest networks, that the Savior may be honored and glorified and remembered in a special way this season and all seasons. The Internet initiative, sponsored by the Church’s Mormon.org website, will run Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 6-8 April 2012. Comments from the Church’s Missionary Department explained that this will be a unique chance for Mormons to share their personal testimony of Jesus Christ with people of other faiths. Read the rest of this entry »  Read More →

Jesus Christ, Lamb of God

Jesus Christ, Lamb of God

Easter is coming in just a few days. As a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (a Mormon), Easter means much more to me than spring flowers and chocolate bunnies. I am a Christian, with a deep and abiding love for Jesus Christ. As always at this time of year, I feel both profound sorrow and profound joy as I contemplate the sacrifice of our Savior when He took upon Himself all the sins and evil of the world, suffered, and was crucified. It is almost unbearable to remember His sufferings. Yet my heart is filled with overwhelming joy at His resurrection, which brings with it the incredible promise of eternal life. The Doctrine and Covenants, which contains revelations from God given through modern Mormon prophets, uses a beautiful image to describe Jesus’ atonement.  Jesus has “descended below all things, …that he might be in all and through all things, the light of truth” (from The Doctrine and Covenants, section 88, verse 6). The darkness... Read the rest of this entry »

Reflections on Christ at the Garden Tomb

Reflections on Christ at the Garden Tomb

Emily Holmstead. Today after church we went to the Garden Tomb, one of the sites where Jesus may have been buried. It is beautiful, simple, and peaceful; a welcome break from the gilded churches where people choke on incense, contradictory doctrine and centuries of sectarian bickering.Next to the site there is a cliff with a combination of outcroppings and indentations that look a bit like a Golgatha (a skull). The bottom of it is covered because the ground level has risen since the time of Jesus. Due to that and some other specifics in the Bible and particularities about the site (including the fact that there is one part of the tomb that looks like it was carved out hurriedly for someone three inches taller than the man the tomb was originally constructed for) it is widely to be the site of the crucifixion and burial of Christ. The caretakers actually let you go into the tomb itself. Through some stealthy maneuvering on my part, I got to be inside alone by myself for a few minutes. I... Read the rest of this entry »

Why is Jesus Christ Called the Son of Man?

Why is Jesus Christ Called the Son of Man?

Why is Jesus Christ called the Son of Man?  While others in the Scriptures (particularly the Old Testament) who are called “son[s] of man” (Jeremiah 49:18, Ezekiel 4:16, Psalms 8:4), the word “son” is uncapitalized.  Elder James E. Talmage, a Biblical scholar, sheds light on the answer in his renown work, Jesus the Christ.  He says, “In applying the designation to Himself, the Lord invariably uses the definite article. ‘The Son of Man’ was and is, specifically and exclusively, Jesus Christ. While as a matter of solemn certainty He was the only male human being from Adam down who was not the son of a mortal man, He used the title in a way to conclusively demonstrate that it was peculiarly and solely His own. It is plainly evident that the expression is fraught with a meaning beyond that conveyed by the words in common usage. The distinguishing appellation has been construed by many to indicate our Lord’s humble station as a mortal, and to connote that He stood... Read the rest of this entry »

Who/What is God?

Who/What is God?

Before I say anything else, I want to make it clear that the real answer to this question is beyond the scope of this article; indeed, it is beyond the scope of mortality and all things temporal: for “this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent” (John 17:3). Furthermore, “it will be a great while after you have passed through the veil before you will have learned [all the principles of exaltation]. It is not all to be comprehended in this world; it will be a great work to learn our salvation and exaltation even beyond the grave (Joseph Smith, History of the Church, 6:306-7). I am now able to attempt a basic answer to the above question. One of the most profound statements that will act as a beginning to our answer was made by the Prophet Joseph Smith. He said, “It is the first principle of the gospel to know for a certainty the Character of God” (Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, comp. Joseph Fielding Smith. Salt... Read the rest of this entry »

Why is Jesus Called the Firstborn?

Why is Jesus Called the Firstborn?

When we think about what it means to be born, we usually think of being given life and a mortal body from a father and a mother. Therefore, when asking “What does it mean to say that Christ is the Firstborn?” another question usually comes up: “How can Christ be the firstborn if he lived in what is sometimes called the meridian of time?” In order to answer these questions, we must rethink our definition what it means to be born. The scriptures speak of receiving a rebirth when one receives a remission of sins. But since Christ never sinned, this cannot be the case. “They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick” (Matthew 9:12). At any rate, when people are born, they are thought of as receiving life. Hence, to be reborn is to receive life anew. One way in which Jesus is the firstborn is because he “is risen from the dead, and become the firstfruits of them that slept” (1 Corinthians 15:20). By calling Christ the Firstborn... Read the rest of this entry »

Divine Names and Titles of Jesus Christ

Divine Names and Titles of Jesus Christ

The divinity of Jesus Christ is indicated by the specific names and titles authoritatively applied to Him. According to man’s judgment there may be but little importance attached to names; but in the nomenclature of the Gods every name is a title of power or station. God is righteously zealous of the sanctity of His own name (Exodus 20:7; Leviticus 19:12; Deuteronomy 5:11) and of names given by His appointment. In the case of children of promise names have been prescribed before birth; this is true of our Lord Jesus and of the Baptist, John, who was sent to prepare the way for the Christ. Names of persons have been changed by divine direction, when not sufficiently definite as titles denoting the particular service to which the bearers were called, or the special blessings conferred upon them.* Jesus is the individual name of the Savior, and as thus spelled is of Greek derivation; its Hebrew equivalent was Yehoshua or Yeshua, or, as we render it in English, Joshua. In the original... Read the rest of this entry »

The Twofold Effect of the Atonement

The Twofold Effect of the Atonement

Through the atonement accomplished by Jesus Christ—a redeeming service, vicariously rendered in behalf of mankind, all of whom have become estranged from God by the effects of sin both inherited and individually incurred—the way is opened for a reconciliation whereby man may come again into communion with God, and be made fit to dwell anew and forever in the presence of his Eternal Father. This basal thought is admirably implied in our English word, “atonement,” which, as its syllables attest, is at-one-ment, “denoting reconciliation, or the bringing into agreement of those who have been estranged.” (New Standard Dictionary under “propitiation.”) The effect of the atonement may be conveniently considered as twofold: 1—The universal redemption of the human race from death invoked by the fall of our first parents; and, 2—Salvation, whereby means of relief from the results of individual sin are provided. The victory over death was made manifest in... Read the rest of this entry »

An Empty Sacrament Table

An Empty Sacrament Table

One Sunday morning our teenage son stood with two other priests to administer the sacrament, as they had done on many prior occasions. They pulled back the white cloth, but to their dismay there was no bread. One of them slipped out to the preparation room in hopes some could be found.  There was none. Finally our troubled son made his way to the bishop and shared the concern with him. A wise bishop then stood, explained the situation to the congregation, and asked, “How would it be if the sacrament table were empty today because there were no Atonement?” I have thought of that often–what would it be like if there were no bread there because there had been no crucifixion, no water because there had been no shedding of blood? If there had been no Atonement, what would the consequences be to us? Of course, the question is now moot, but it does put in perspective our total dependence on the Lord. To ask and answer this question only heightens our awareness of, and appreciation... Read the rest of this entry »

Was Jesus’ tomb empty?

Was Jesus’ tomb empty?

The four Gospels are consistent in their report that some of Jesus’ disciples found his tomb empty on the first day of the week (see Matthew 28:6; Mark 16:6; Luke 24:3; and John 20:1-2). No one during the first or second centuries suggested that Jesus Christ had not been buried in a tomb following his death by crucifixion. Such a counter-argument has risen only in the past few years among a few select scholars who question the historical reliability of the Gospel accounts. During the first and second centuries, the controversy regarding the empty tomb centered on how it had become empty, not whether or not Jesus Christ had been buried. As Matthew reports, “And when they were assembled with the elders, and had taken counsel, they gave large money unto the soldiers, Saying, Say ye, His disciples came by night, and stole him away while we slept. . . . So they took the money, and did as they were taught: and this saying is commonly reported among the Jews until this day” (Matthew 28:12-15).... Read the rest of this entry »